opentrends:

Secret History of OpenStack, the Free Cloud Software That’s Changing Everything http://ping.fm/BxJ1U

lavacheestdanslepre:

My library books are late.

lavacheestdanslepre:

My library books are late.

Like many of you foodies out there, I can read a cookbook as if it was a novel, When I get a new cookbook I usually read it from cover to cover and then put it away with ALL the others. I must admit I always judge a cookbook by its photographs , I was originally drawn to the book by photos in the Urban Cook. They are courtesy of the talented Cath Muscat, and they are just gorgeous. But the Urban Cook is not just a cook book, but a very readable book in it’s own right.  So much wonderful information about sustainable and ethical food production - the book is subtitled Cooking and eating for a sustainable future. There is a very interesting mix of Asian and Western dishes throughout the book.  I confess that I had been expecting they’d all be tending towards the Asian side, as Mark is the head chef  of the Red Lantern, not that I would mind of course…
 
The meat and poultry sections were eye-opening.  Of course I’ve seen watched Jamie Oliver’s Chicken special, and been aware of intensive chicken rearing.  But I didn’t really know that free-range doesn’t always mean that the chickens go outside, EEK, just that the door is left open for them.  But with food and water and shelter inside some rarely go out.  Organic farms and farming methods are subject to such intense scrutiny to get and keep their organic certification that this is really the only option for concerned cooks who want to make a statement about ethical food production  methods. More scary still is the lack of genetic diversity.  Because consumers like white meat, chickens have been bred to have big breasts, strong bones and a docile temperament.  Thus almost all cage chickens in Australia are derived from selective breeding of just three breeds.
The seafood chapter has a very interesting essay on aquaculture and intensive fish farming.  Mark has certainly done his research about the different ways fish, as well as beef, lamb and chickens are raised, and the book is recommended as much for these interesting and thought-provoking articles on food production as for the recipes. The Urban Cook is far more than a commercial exercise. Jensen’s passion for the topic is palpable. He’s done his homework and helps readers make informed decisions about issues such as wild fish versus aquaculture; intensely raised animals versus free range and organic farms, and polyculture versus monoculture farming methods. Each chapter begins with a well-researched discussion of sustainable issues.

Like many of you foodies out there, I can read a cookbook as if it was a novel, When I get a new cookbook I usually read it from cover to cover and then put it away with ALL the others. I must admit I always judge a cookbook by its photographs , I was originally drawn to the book by photos in the Urban Cook. They are courtesy of the talented Cath Muscat, and they are just gorgeous. But the Urban Cook is not just a cook book, but a very readable book in it’s own right.  So much wonderful information about sustainable and ethical food production - the book is subtitled Cooking and eating for a sustainable future. There is a very interesting mix of Asian and Western dishes throughout the book.  I confess that I had been expecting they’d all be tending towards the Asian side, as Mark is the head chef  of the Red Lantern, not that I would mind of course…

 

The meat and poultry sections were eye-opening.  Of course I’ve seen watched Jamie Oliver’s Chicken special, and been aware of intensive chicken rearing.  But I didn’t really know that free-range doesn’t always mean that the chickens go outside, EEK, just that the door is left open for them.  But with food and water and shelter inside some rarely go out.  Organic farms and farming methods are subject to such intense scrutiny to get and keep their organic certification that this is really the only option for concerned cooks who want to make a statement about ethical food production  methods. More scary still is the lack of genetic diversity.  Because consumers like white meat, chickens have been bred to have big breasts, strong bones and a docile temperament.  Thus almost all cage chickens in Australia are derived from selective breeding of just three breeds.

The seafood chapter has a very interesting essay on aquaculture and intensive fish farming.  Mark has certainly done his research about the different ways fish, as well as beef, lamb and chickens are raised, and the book is recommended as much for these interesting and thought-provoking articles on food production as for the recipes. The Urban Cook is far more than a commercial exercise. Jensen’s passion for the topic is palpable. He’s done his homework and helps readers make informed decisions about issues such as wild fish versus aquaculture; intensely raised animals versus free range and organic farms, and polyculture versus monoculture farming methods. Each chapter begins with a well-researched discussion of sustainable issues.

After Dark by Haruki Murakami
Prior to my reading of this book I noted that most Murakami fans gave this book rather negative reviews; most of them disliking it or thinking of it as substandard to Murakami’s other works. The story is about Mari, a 19-year-old girl who we first see reading at a Denny’s just before midnight. Through the course of the night, Mari reconnects with an acquaintance named Takahashi, helps a Chinese prostitute who has been beaten by her trick, and generally begins to understand and reveal some things about herself that she never had before. The small hours of the morning are a perfect time for introspection — and, together with Takasashi, Mari begins to work out many of the problems that had resulted in her not being able to sleep in the first place. One of those is her sister Eri who has been sleeping for more than two months. Throughout the novel, we look in on Eri, literally. Murakami tells us that we’re like a ghost floating above her bed, observing her. After Dark reads like a movie, the scenes are presented in a seemingly chronological manner. Like a camera, it zooms into the lives of interconnected individuals during the late hours of the day until dawn. It is reminiscent of Before Sunset/Sunrise, wherein you watch a long conversation unfold given very few hours; though the intruding lenses reminds you of Orwell’s 1984. The novel explores the world after dark. For while majority of the world functions during the day, there is a world after dark. I often wondered why cities never sleep and often we forget that some people begin their day when it is after dark. Part truth, part strange, Murakami plays with life after dark. He divides the story into chapters, along odd time, rather than sticking to clear times like 12:30 he would use 12:37.  The book chapters mainly divide itself between the two sisters, Mari and Eri Asai. The book explores their very different worlds and personalities as well as the great divide. It is in the ending that Murakami allows the merging of these two worlds by the simple act of sleeping next to each other. After Dark is a seemingly straightforward narrative that follows the life events of ordinary people—a student, a worker, and a trombone player.
This story is narrated using a third-person, all-seeing point of view which has a voice of its own. It is able to comment on events, but not intrude. Mari, the female protagonist doesn’t narrate the story or any parts of it. Jazz music, food, and the inexplicable – fill the pages of After Dark. He explores a bit of the unconscious through ‘Sleeping Beauty’ and its connection to dreams. He includes a discussion of death in a conversation the protagonist has with one of the minor characters.  
I picked this up with some trepidation, it’s a very short novel at only 191 pages that Murakami fans seem to like the least of all his work But I really enjoyed it. I guess by normal fiction standards, this is a weird novel and it is hard to explain exactly why it resonated with me. But it did. And it will for you too, if you’re the kind of person who has ever laid in bed awake at night and had a ton of ideas that seemed great at the time, but utterly ludicrous under the glare of daylight. Yes, night has its own logic, and this novel drives that point home beautifully.

After Dark by Haruki Murakami

Prior to my reading of this book I noted that most Murakami fans gave this book rather negative reviews; most of them disliking it or thinking of it as substandard to Murakami’s other works. The story is about Mari, a 19-year-old girl who we first see reading at a Denny’s just before midnight. Through the course of the night, Mari reconnects with an acquaintance named Takahashi, helps a Chinese prostitute who has been beaten by her trick, and generally begins to understand and reveal some things about herself that she never had before. The small hours of the morning are a perfect time for introspection — and, together with Takasashi, Mari begins to work out many of the problems that had resulted in her not being able to sleep in the first place. One of those is her sister Eri who has been sleeping for more than two months. Throughout the novel, we look in on Eri, literally. Murakami tells us that we’re like a ghost floating above her bed, observing her. After Dark reads like a movie, the scenes are presented in a seemingly chronological manner. Like a camera, it zooms into the lives of interconnected individuals during the late hours of the day until dawn. It is reminiscent of Before Sunset/Sunrise, wherein you watch a long conversation unfold given very few hours; though the intruding lenses reminds you of Orwell’s 1984. The novel explores the world after dark. For while majority of the world functions during the day, there is a world after dark. I often wondered why cities never sleep and often we forget that some people begin their day when it is after dark. Part truth, part strange, Murakami plays with life after dark. He divides the story into chapters, along odd time, rather than sticking to clear times like 12:30 he would use 12:37.  The book chapters mainly divide itself between the two sisters, Mari and Eri Asai. The book explores their very different worlds and personalities as well as the great divide. It is in the ending that Murakami allows the merging of these two worlds by the simple act of sleeping next to each other. After Dark is a seemingly straightforward narrative that follows the life events of ordinary people—a student, a worker, and a trombone player.

This story is narrated using a third-person, all-seeing point of view which has a voice of its own. It is able to comment on events, but not intrude. Mari, the female protagonist doesn’t narrate the story or any parts of it. Jazz music, food, and the inexplicable – fill the pages of After Dark. He explores a bit of the unconscious through ‘Sleeping Beauty’ and its connection to dreams. He includes a discussion of death in a conversation the protagonist has with one of the minor characters.  

I picked this up with some trepidation, it’s a very short novel at only 191 pages that Murakami fans seem to like the least of all his work But I really enjoyed it. I guess by normal fiction standards, this is a weird novel and it is hard to explain exactly why it resonated with me. But it did. And it will for you too, if you’re the kind of person who has ever laid in bed awake at night and had a ton of ideas that seemed great at the time, but utterly ludicrous under the glare of daylight. Yes, night has its own logic, and this novel drives that point home beautifully.

THE NIGHT ETERNAL is the final volume in Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampire trilogy that began with THE STRAIN and continued with THE FALL. This last installment takes place some two years after the beginning of THE STRAIN, when a plane lands in New York at the end of a fateful transcontinental European flight and signals the beginning of the end. As the novel commences, the subjugation of humankind by the. The majority of the human race has been wiped out. Women with the correct blood type are kept in breeding pens, in order to provide blood stock with which to feed the vampires. A maintenance-level population is kept alive in order to keep things running as kind of a monstrous perpetual motion machine. Compliance with the Master gets you fed and sheltered, and keeps you alive. A few humans here and there form pockets of resistance that are systematically hunted down and wiped out. One of the few remaining and very wanted groups is still led by Dr. Eph Goodweather, formerly with the Centers for Disease Control, whose ex-wife has been turned by the Master and now sits at the fiend’s right hand with Zack, Eph’s son, who believes his father to be dead and who is being groomed to succeed the Master. Eph is slowly succumbing to a steady ingestion of controlled substances, the result being that he is no longer reliable to the rest of the team, which includes Vasily Fet; Dr. Nora Martinez and Gus the gangbanger. There is also Quinlan, the mixed species offspring of the Master, who is bent on achieving a revenge that has been festering for centuries upon his father. The secret to bringing the Master down is contained in an ancient text, couched in riddles and hidden in puzzles. The conclusion boils down to a conflict between two beings, each of whom uses the son of the other as a weapon. This installment is at least  more smartly told than the two preceding volumes in the series. One of my main complaints about The Fall was that it beat the reader over the head with Nazi references; thank god not so much in The Night Eternal. The references are still there, but they’re more subtle and sinister, which in turn makes them a bit more frightening and realistic. For a large proportion of the book, it’s not the vampires or even the Master who are the bad guys. Much like the Nazi collaborators and sympathizers from World War II, the bad guys are the people who willingly side with the vampires and work to subjugate their fellow humans. In addition to the increase in subtlety, there was also better character development in this volume. Everyone feels like they came into their own  a bit more in this installment. Eph is beyond broken, but he’s not quite beaten. Nora found her balls (hallelujah). Fet and Gus have, for all intents and purposes, taken charge of their group’s resistance efforts. Mr. Quinlan’s story is fleshed out, and in the process, we learn about the Ancients’ origins. Zack is both strangely stronger and much, much more fragile under the Master’s care. And in the middle of all of this, the Master himself sits like a giant spider at the center of its web, pulling a string here, weaving a trap there, and sending whispery threads of influence, fear, and intimidation directly into the minds of the people trying to defeat him. Bottom line, The Strain was enjoyable. I really wasn’t thrilled with The Fall, but I think it served its place in developing the various story lines. The Night Eternal was a good end to the series and made up for alot of the issues I had with the second book, still haven’t forgiven the first one though… 

THE NIGHT ETERNAL is the final volume in Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampire trilogy that began with THE STRAIN and continued with THE FALL. This last installment takes place some two years after the beginning of THE STRAIN, when a plane lands in New York at the end of a fateful transcontinental European flight and signals the beginning of the end. As the novel commences, the subjugation of humankind by the. The majority of the human race has been wiped out. Women with the correct blood type are kept in breeding pens, in order to provide blood stock with which to feed the vampires. A maintenance-level population is kept alive in order to keep things running as kind of a monstrous perpetual motion machine. Compliance with the Master gets you fed and sheltered, and keeps you alive. A few humans here and there form pockets of resistance that are systematically hunted down and wiped out. One of the few remaining and very wanted groups is still led by Dr. Eph Goodweather, formerly with the Centers for Disease Control, whose ex-wife has been turned by the Master and now sits at the fiend’s right hand with Zack, Eph’s son, who believes his father to be dead and who is being groomed to succeed the Master. Eph is slowly succumbing to a steady ingestion of controlled substances, the result being that he is no longer reliable to the rest of the team, which includes Vasily Fet; Dr. Nora Martinez and Gus the gangbanger. There is also Quinlan, the mixed species offspring of the Master, who is bent on achieving a revenge that has been festering for centuries upon his father. The secret to bringing the Master down is contained in an ancient text, couched in riddles and hidden in puzzles. The conclusion boils down to a conflict between two beings, each of whom uses the son of the other as a weapon. This installment is at least  more smartly told than the two preceding volumes in the series. One of my main complaints about The Fall was that it beat the reader over the head with Nazi references; thank god not so much in The Night Eternal. The references are still there, but they’re more subtle and sinister, which in turn makes them a bit more frightening and realistic. For a large proportion of the book, it’s not the vampires or even the Master who are the bad guys. Much like the Nazi collaborators and sympathizers from World War II, the bad guys are the people who willingly side with the vampires and work to subjugate their fellow humans. In addition to the increase in subtlety, there was also better character development in this volume. Everyone feels like they came into their own  a bit more in this installment. Eph is beyond broken, but he’s not quite beaten. Nora found her balls (hallelujah). Fet and Gus have, for all intents and purposes, taken charge of their group’s resistance efforts. Mr. Quinlan’s story is fleshed out, and in the process, we learn about the Ancients’ origins. Zack is both strangely stronger and much, much more fragile under the Master’s care. And in the middle of all of this, the Master himself sits like a giant spider at the center of its web, pulling a string here, weaving a trap there, and sending whispery threads of influence, fear, and intimidation directly into the minds of the people trying to defeat him. Bottom line, The Strain was enjoyable. I really wasn’t thrilled with The Fall, but I think it served its place in developing the various story lines. The Night Eternal was a good end to the series and made up for alot of the issues I had with the second book, still haven’t forgiven the first one though… 

I really wanted to like this book but am sadly disappointed. The concept is interesting, especially in light of recent archaeological evidence suggesting that Neandertals and Cro-Magnons (anatomically modern humans) may have interbred. However, if found the execution poor. The pacing is uneven, the prose flowery and the characters are flat. Auel has the tendency to just dump a whole pile of information on you frequently disrupting the flow of the story to deliver lengthy descriptions of plants, rocks, characters’ appearances, etc. I understand that setting is important and it’s obvious that she did her research, but I felt the depiction could have been done better. Auel describes the same caves, valleys, and plants over and over again. There were constant reiterations of how different Ayla is, how special, how strange, how unique. Yes, she is different from the people of the clan but I’m assuming it is because she is a different species. This book just totally failed to draw me in by the time I got a third of the way through and I must admit I haven’t had the persistence to finish it. I would normally push through and read till the end (I have read some gems that at first were a real struggle to start with) I will try again though, at a later date. So ‘The Clan of the Cave Bear’ goes back in to the ‘to read’ pile, whence it came. I will let you know more when I get through the whole thing.

I really wanted to like this book but am sadly disappointed. The concept is interesting, especially in light of recent archaeological evidence suggesting that Neandertals and Cro-Magnons (anatomically modern humans) may have interbred. However, if found the execution poor. The pacing is uneven, the prose flowery and the characters are flat. Auel has the tendency to just dump a whole pile of information on you frequently disrupting the flow of the story to deliver lengthy descriptions of plants, rocks, characters’ appearances, etc. I understand that setting is important and it’s obvious that she did her research, but I felt the depiction could have been done better. Auel describes the same caves, valleys, and plants over and over again. There were constant reiterations of how different Ayla is, how special, how strange, how unique. Yes, she is different from the people of the clan but I’m assuming it is because she is a different species. This book just totally failed to draw me in by the time I got a third of the way through and I must admit I haven’t had the persistence to finish it. I would normally push through and read till the end (I have read some gems that at first were a real struggle to start with) I will try again though, at a later date. So ‘The Clan of the Cave Bear’ goes back in to the ‘to read’ pile, whence it came. I will let you know more when I get through the whole thing.

My last book club book as acting Assitant Librarian at Maylands was ‘The Hand that First Held Mine’ by Maggie O’Farrel. The book gets of to an awkward start in a Devon lane, and then goes on to cut between two timelines. In the late 1950s, Lexie Sinclair arrives in London, falls crashingly in love with magazine editor Innes Kent, and plunges into a vivid, vital world of art, sex, G&Ts and late nights spent poring over page proofs. She learns the journalistic ropes, she learns how to dress; she learns to survive shattering loss. All the while, thanks to the observations of O’Farrell’s wry, omniscient narrative voice we know she’s heading for disaster, “She has no idea she will die young”.
In the present day, in another part of London, a near-fatal caesarean pitches Elina and her boyfriend, Ted, on to the coalface of parenthood. The birth itself was so awful that her mind has apparently excised it. And she’s not the only one with memory trouble. As his son grows, Ted finds himself buffeted by flashbacks from his own childhood. At first, past and present seem unconnected, but even before the link emerges the parallels are clear. Lexie and Elina are both steeped in the art world; they share a love of clothes and paintings form a physical bond between the times, as do locations. The connection of Ted and Elina to Lexie and that vanished era does however become too obvious too soon, yet O’Farrell remains engaging and fluent. Despite my preconceptions about this book (this is really not what I would usually read, but that is the best thing about book club, reading things you wouldn’t normally even pull of the shelf), I ended up really enjoying this.

My last book club book as acting Assitant Librarian at Maylands was ‘The Hand that First Held Mine’ by Maggie O’Farrel. The book gets of to an awkward start in a Devon lane, and then goes on to cut between two timelines. In the late 1950s, Lexie Sinclair arrives in London, falls crashingly in love with magazine editor Innes Kent, and plunges into a vivid, vital world of art, sex, G&Ts and late nights spent poring over page proofs. She learns the journalistic ropes, she learns how to dress; she learns to survive shattering loss. All the while, thanks to the observations of O’Farrell’s wry, omniscient narrative voice we know she’s heading for disaster, “She has no idea she will die young”.

In the present day, in another part of London, a near-fatal caesarean pitches Elina and her boyfriend, Ted, on to the coalface of parenthood. The birth itself was so awful that her mind has apparently excised it. And she’s not the only one with memory trouble. As his son grows, Ted finds himself buffeted by flashbacks from his own childhood. At first, past and present seem unconnected, but even before the link emerges the parallels are clear. Lexie and Elina are both steeped in the art world; they share a love of clothes and paintings form a physical bond between the times, as do locations. The connection of Ted and Elina to Lexie and that vanished era does however become too obvious too soon, yet O’Farrell remains engaging and fluent. Despite my preconceptions about this book (this is really not what I would usually read, but that is the best thing about book club, reading things you wouldn’t normally even pull of the shelf), I ended up really enjoying this.

  
I have just finished Justin Cronin’s ample vampire-virus saga “The Passage”, while it presents a vivid eschatology, its title indicates an even more profound transformation of one sort of literary sensibility into another. This is a staggering book of speculative fiction, NOT your typical zombie or vampire novel; it isn’t cheesy or reductive. There is a lot more than good and evil at play here, although of course not entirely unavoidable, as the human race must combat malevolent viral creatures. But the incipience, growth, and psychology of these viral entities is not so simple. The relationship between the ‘virals’ and survivors is very complex. The human condition is explored in different states of wakefulness and sleep, in a myriad of conscious states, and connects all beings, whether viral or human and the constant question “who am I?”. 
 The Passage covers a long period of time, approximately one hundred years, starting circa 2014, and delves more densely and philosophically into the dark and grey areas of the human psyche. Cronin creates a sense of place; of time; of timelessness; and his explorations of memories; of memories folded and unfolded and twisted in time; are wonderful. He balances intellectual and action narrative with so much skill. There are, occasionally, times when a character is improbably saved from the clutches of disaster. However the author manages somehow to avoid melodrama and predictability. He gets inside the head of his characters. It is also satisfying to see that this is a very diverse cast of multi-ethnicities. The landscape of people is naturally rendered, not forced but rather a realistic reflection.
This was the first book of a forthcoming trilogy. The journeys on foot or by hoof, by machine or by dream, are full of adventure. It immerses you in all strains of love–sibling, maternal, paternal, friendship and romantic. The Passage has stars, the moon, bones, and blades, guns and garrisons, trees and cliffs and five well crafted complex characters, the friend, the guide, the guardian the genius and the healer all centered around the protagonist. The passage winds up with a jarring cliffhanger. Can’t wait for the follow up, The Twelve in 2012.
Follow this link for an interview with the author and some spoiler about the next 2 books and the script for the movie. http://io9.com/5605835/justin-cronin-explains-his-vampires-in-the-passage-and-drops-spoilers-for-the-next-book

I have just finished Justin Cronin’s ample vampire-virus saga “The Passage”, while it presents a vivid eschatology, its title indicates an even more profound transformation of one sort of literary sensibility into another. This is a staggering book of speculative fiction, NOT your typical zombie or vampire novel; it isn’t cheesy or reductive. There is a lot more than good and evil at play here, although of course not entirely unavoidable, as the human race must combat malevolent viral creatures. But the incipience, growth, and psychology of these viral entities is not so simple. The relationship between the ‘virals’ and survivors is very complex. The human condition is explored in different states of wakefulness and sleep, in a myriad of conscious states, and connects all beings, whether viral or human and the constant question “who am I?”.

 The Passage covers a long period of time, approximately one hundred years, starting circa 2014, and delves more densely and philosophically into the dark and grey areas of the human psyche. Cronin creates a sense of place; of time; of timelessness; and his explorations of memories; of memories folded and unfolded and twisted in time; are wonderful. He balances intellectual and action narrative with so much skill. There are, occasionally, times when a character is improbably saved from the clutches of disaster. However the author manages somehow to avoid melodrama and predictability. He gets inside the head of his characters. It is also satisfying to see that this is a very diverse cast of multi-ethnicities. The landscape of people is naturally rendered, not forced but rather a realistic reflection.

This was the first book of a forthcoming trilogy. The journeys on foot or by hoof, by machine or by dream, are full of adventure. It immerses you in all strains of love–sibling, maternal, paternal, friendship and romantic. The Passage has stars, the moon, bones, and blades, guns and garrisons, trees and cliffs and five well crafted complex characters, the friend, the guide, the guardian the genius and the healer all centered around the protagonist. The passage winds up with a jarring cliffhanger. Can’t wait for the follow up, The Twelve in 2012.

Follow this link for an interview with the author and some spoiler about the next 2 books and the script for the movie. http://io9.com/5605835/justin-cronin-explains-his-vampires-in-the-passage-and-drops-spoilers-for-the-next-book

CIA’s ‘vengeful librarians’ monitor Twitter, Facebook posts

At the agency’s Open Source Center, a team known affectionately as the “vengeful librarians” also pores over Facebook, newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms — anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.”

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/story/2011-11-04/cia-facebook-twitter/51069030/1?csp=34news

The Style Forum: Youse All Should Be Able to Speak Good!

Is TV the clearing house of the English language, the coiner of the new and the carer of the old? A “word nerd” panel, including legendary crossword guy David Astle, debate the pros and cons mass media and its influence on modern English.

The Style Council Centre is not as dusty and musty as it sounds. Yes, it builds databases and archives of spoken and written Australian English and conducts surveys on points of language where Aussies differ from the Poms and the Yanks… but being so positioned in the flux of cultural change also makes it a superb barometer of human behaviour. So, is the influence of mass media on our language making us myopic, superficial and obsessed with gossip? Or have we always been this way?

This debate was held at the annual Style Council Forum and chaired by the ABC Head of News Policy, Alan Sunderland.

Julian Burnside is a barrister, human rights and refugee advocate, and author.

David Astle has built a life around words, as a writer, puzzle-setter, and word master on SBS television’s Letters and Numbers.

Kate Burridge is a prominent Australian linguist specialising in the Germanic languages. Burridge currently occupies the Chair of Linguistics in the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University.

http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2011/11/08/3358258.htm